“What is in a TV?”

Everyday, children bring in school questions and ideas arising from their own life. For example, they all have in home displays and other IT equipment but hardly ever have the chance to find out how do those things look, from inside.

So, whenever this question comes in school, and the truth is it comes quite often, we just give them old pieces of HW and screwdrivers, to find out on their own. It’s always so much fun!

Advertisements

Transferring play into real life conditions

We do offer a DIY class in kindergarten, in order to introduce 6 y.o. children into creative thinking & problem solving attitude.

For example: by  constructing a hydraulic robotic arm from scratch, children transfer their play into real life conditions by engaging in the following. They:

  • Derive the plan
  • Measure the dimensions
  • Cut the wood
  • Trial and error to make the junctions work
  • Understand how the hydraulic pumps work
  • Team & coordinate to make the arm move in all three dimensions

While the above consist the most fascinating play, yet encourage children to develop numbers of skills and engage deeply into creative thinking and innovation.

But most of all it’s just freely selected & non-directed play. Adults do not direct or impose, only inspire and facilitate. It’s not by coincidence that, when such a project is over,  children rarely play with the outcome. They have enjoyed most playing during the construction!

On a free will basis

In a truly play-based environment, every single item can be transformed into a hat, a shoe, a wheel or a stool. That is why our spaces often look like junkyards!

Children should feel completely free to engage into play with anything that exists around, no matter what it may be; so they imagine, innovate, combine, cooperate and develop independent thinking, on a free will basis.

Through the eyes of Riddhi

by Riddhi Nandola*

From my experience, at Dorothy Snot, I can truly say it is an exceptional school. From the first moment to the last, my time spent there was incredible. My first interaction with the school was my walk up to the building and seeing the bright and colorfully painted exterior giving it a feel of welcoming and warmth. Little did I know that the teachers and children would be just as, if not more, kind and welcoming.

My entire classroom was filled with happy and active children. The joy contained by these children was in part due to the extraordinary effort put in by the teachers. I saw first hand the work they put into making the days for the children not only fun but an effective and creative way of learning. The time these teachers spend with the children in school is only half the energy they put into making the school days a good time. They spend a lot of their time out of school preparing lessons and activities for the children.

The school is known for its “play-based” learning, which is a great way for children to absorb as much material as well as expel all the pent-up energy in them. From reading & writing to yoga and outdoor education, the children have a vast amount of opportunities to learn.

The school offers multiple different classes from English to Art, to Outdoor Education. The students are grouped off into their respective classes where they are able to participate in the class and then rotate into another class. This allows the children to interact with the teachers more, thus giving more attention to them, which is always a positive for younger children. Following these lessons, the children are involved in a free play which allows them to be creative while also subconsciously discovering more about their selves.

Overall, the school is designed and includes teachers that allow the children to grow up to be well rounded and kind individuals.

 

* Riddhi, a student from Canada, became part of our our school during May and June 2018, while participating in AIESEC’s “International Kindergarten” exchange program

Have you ever seen Santa?

The real one!

Well, we have a plan. We are going to catch him. Here’s how:

We made cookies for Santa. We wrapped them in cellophane so when he tries to eat them he’ll make a lot of noise.

We scattered carrots. if they disappear, it means reindeer have been here!

Wrote Santa riddles we know he likes: “It’s yellow and black . it goes bzzzzzzzz…. What is it?”

We decorated our Christmas tree….

…with handmade ornaments

We wrote a thank you note and filled it with glitter,

so when Santa opens it, glitter will sprinkle all over him and leave a trail!

And now all we have to do is wait for him to come. Good luck to us…….!

(by Claire Hadjinikolaou, our English language teacher)

International Fairy Tea Party Day 2017

On International Fairy Tea Party Day we went on a hunt for fairies and found all the evidence we need to prove that fairies do exist!

After reading a story about a naughty fairy, we looked for fairy signs.

Flowers where fairies like to sleep.

Acorns they like to eat

Fairy rings

And wands they use to turn anyone in anything they want.

After spending the whole day tracking them we decided to dance in a circle to call for them.

They didn’t appear but they left a surprise for us instead. They filled the place with colors!

And sprinkled fairy dust all around

They even gave us wings to fly

They also left a book for us to read.

After reading it we act out the story and threw a fairy tea party in their honor.

What better way to celebrate the wonderful world of nature all around us?

While sparking their imagination, children exercised their tracking skills and learned how to spot the tell-tale signs of fairies.

(by Claire Hadjinikolaou, our English language teacher)