Dorothy Snot sent us a postcard!

During the first days of school this year, children in pre-K class read the book “The disappearance of Dorothy Snot”, the book out of which our school was named of!


As the story was moving on, Dorothy started sending letters to the children. Green envelops began to appear in class, very often. Dorothy was asking for help and ideas.


In one of her letters, she sent us some photos of her last trips around the world and asked for our imagination: Was it possible for us to construct with those images by using toys and other materials?


Children thought of it, worked together, and responded to Dorothy’s request with great success!


(by Spyridoula Patouna, teacher in pre-K class in Athens)

Play in toddlers’ class

Play, is:

  • Two painter balls in a box


  • Building towers using glasses


  • Meeting your friends under the table


  • Wearing strange metal shoes


  • Wiping the salt


  • Playing music


  • Inventing a way to reach the balloons up in the ceiling


  • Spreading the clothes


  • Talking with your best friend


  • And after all these exhausting things, go to sleep!


Play is life. Children’s life.

(by Jenny Diamantopoulou, teacher in toddlers’ class in Athens)

Looking deeper

Drawing with cars is not just a fun activity for babies.


Looking deeper,  someone realizes that through this activity babies interact one another, gain socialization skills, taste the car, throw it down to listen to the sound, and more….

We teachers, the only think to do is to observe all these different behaviors.

Just by evaluating children’ reaction in any activity, we learn so many thinks.

(by Anastasia Kouroubali, teacher in babies class, in Athens)

Shall we play?

One of everyone’s chlidhood favorite games is definitely blind man’s buff.


All of us have funny stories on wrong identifications to tell and all of us still clearly remember our intense feelings at the moment of blindfolding, when the game was starting.


Same with very young kids: this process is especially well taken by them. There is great anticipation on who will take the place of the next “blind man”.


But why is this so important from educational point of view?

  • Because they play and have fun
  • Because they strenghthen their bonds and relationships
  • Because interaction with each other is enhanced


  • Because they develop orientation skills
  • Because they enhance their optical memory
  • Because they learn in practice what “drama” means
  • Because they constantly ask to repeat the process

So, shall we play?

(by Chryssa Vaitsi, teacher in post-toddlers class, in Athens)